Dating royal doulton bunnykins marks

Old English is the name of the shape style of the pieces in this line. The Old English shape can be found with numerous different decorations from simple to very complex patterns. This site lists just a few of the different patterns used on the Old English shape: You may be able to narrow down the numerous results you will likely receive by adding platter or plate to the search term. If you don’t see your pattern use the name of the next most common piece in a china set in the search term i. Eventually, you will find a match for the decoration on your platter if not the platter itself. Even if you don’t find an exact match, you can get a solid idea of the value based on the prices platters of the same size in other, similar decorations are bringing.

Dating english pottery marks

Most of this faience is marked. These marks indicate the manufacturer, the year the object was produced and, occasionally, the maker of the object. Given the number of manufacturers and the long production period of this earthenware, it is often difficult to date an object. This is precisely the reason for this website!

The “HB” mark was first used on pieces made by the Hubaudiere-Bousquet factory in Quimper, France in the mids, and has had many incarnations. Subtle differences in these marks can lend to more accurately dating this type of pottery, according to information provided on the Old Quimper website.

Potteries in the area making mostly simply-shaped earthenware vases, urns, plates or tiles date as far back as the early 16thC. Some examples are Polychrome i. Deft Chinoiserie were a Europeanized form of Chinese exports of the time and were designed or modelled with Western tastes in mind. Delft as a style is still quite popular these days. Pretty souvenirs from Holland or other decorative objects are produced in droves.

Potteries in other countries were also very prolific and early adopters of this style, mostly ca mid thC onwards, and especially in the UK – termed English Deftware , very often in polychrome designs – but also in France and Italy. Many of these are actually mass produced in China and may have had some decorative finishing touches at one of the numerous workshops near their place of sale. Such examples of Delftware is specifically destined for the tourist trade and in most cases are of good quality, but not of any significant appraisal value.

However, some companies have continued the tradition of making pottery in the old manner, both in using tested techniques or materials and also in the true ancient Delft design style. The vast majority of these are often accurate and fine reproductions of specimens found in Museums or fine private collections and very desirable by collectors, even though some may be fairly recent.

Additionally, some Delft-ware, particularly those made in France around mid-to-late 19thC, were marked with logos or symbols usually letters or initials that are almost identical to those used by authentic potteries in Delft some years earlier and which were by then extinct. These antique French Delft marks are also tabulated and explained in our Ceramics marks guides.

Some of these were made ca 19thC, but the vast majority hail from relatively recent times and are often mass-produced.

Staffordshire Pottery Marks

This printed mark was also used from c. This ‘S printed mark has J. This printed mark was used from c. The Registration number was also used from These standard printed mark dates from to

The mark has the Roman numerals “IV” at the top of the mark if it is for a ceramic. Between and , the diamond-shaped mark was used. Marks registered from to have a letter at the top of the diamond. Marks registered from to have .

Mason’s Ironstone First sold in the Regency period as a robust alternative to porcelain, Mason’s Ironstone China soon won customers with its attractive enamelled decoration, and is still widely appreciated today. A great variety of patterns appeared on Mason’s Ironstone including blue and white in the Chinese style. Most, though, drew on the Japanese tradition and were rendered in a sparkling palette of luminous enamel colours over a natural white ground.

Mason’s Ironstone, a strong, hardwearing stoneware that imitated the shapes and decoration of 18thcentury porcelain, was developed in the early 19th century by Miles Mason, a Staffordshire porcelain dealer and manufacturer. Although it was a stoneware, it became the ‘household china’ of the aspiring middle classes who could not afford porcelain for everyday use. Mason retired in and handed the business to his sons, Charles, who patented the name ‘Mason’s Patent Ironstone China’, and George, who worked mainly on the administrative side.

The patent name was a masterstroke, conjuring up both the strength of stoneware and the refinement of porcelain. The ware backed up the name. Made from a whitish clay mixed with a powdered glassy slag, it was smooth, slightly translucent, but robust. When tapped with a fingernail, it gave off a satisfying metallic ring.

What is Majolica? The Marks That Make This Pottery Unique

Here are some tips. This though can only be a guide to a date – it is not an exact science and some backstamps were used for many, many years. Learning about styles and shapes can also help date pieces, particularly on the older pieces from the early s when many were not marked. In the book you will find over backstamps described. More have been discovered since and are occasionally published by the Spode Society in their publication ‘The Review’.

English Registry Marks DATING ENGLISH POTTERY & CERAMICS The diamond-shaped English Registry mark, was used by the English patent office from to to identify pieces of English pottery and porcelain.

If you are trying to find the meaning of elusive pottery marks or need to research famous potters we have a large selection of both and are adding to the site all the time. There are some useful guides about how to look after your collection, and even start your collection. Please feel free to bookmark the site and browse at your convenience. Collecting Pottery Sylvac cat People have admired fine china pottery for centuries, but collecting ordinary domestic pottery and local wares is a more recent interest.

Pottery by fashionable makers and designers is expensive, especially in antique shops and specialised sales, but it is still possible to build an interesting collection of modern ceramics without breaking the bank. Starting a pottery collection Keep your eyes open. You need great enthusiasm and a willingness to hunt for interesting pottery everywhere you go.

Look out for antique fairs, general auctions, house clearance sales, junk shops and car boot sales — anywhere that might have china and pottery for sale. Have you looked in your own attic. After years of the Antiques Roadshow, there are not many genuine Ming vases just waiting to be picked up for a song, but some copies have become collectable and valuable in their own right. The recent vogue for Clarice Cliff has led to faking of pieces like the conical sugar shakers — the originals can fetch thousands of pounds at auction.

The cunning forgers use household dust from vacuum cleaners and tea to age their copies. Look out for normal wear, particularly on the base of household pottery — genuine wear from years of use is more difficult to fake than dust. Pottery Marks Pottery marks The makers pottery marks can help with identification, but fakes may have convincing copies of the makers mark — though it may not be the right mark.

Rookwood Pottery Marks

One comment Staffordshire Pottery Identification Using Backstamps The name of the pottery manufacturer and an approximation of date of manufacture can be discovered if the piece of pottery has a backstamp. There are way too many to list here as it would take a whole new website to list them all! The best reference book we have found is the Encyclopaedia of British Pottery and Porcelain Marks by Geoffrey A Godden and is probably the only book you will ever need.

Pottery & Porcelain Marks You can look for your mark by shape (below) or you can use the mark search box on the bottom right of the page. To scan by shape, look at your mark and determine the most likely shape category listed below such as crowns, shields, birds, etc.

Your guide to antique pottery marks, porcelain marks and china marks Collecting Antique Ceramics Collecting Antique Ceramics offers the widest range of opportunities for antique collectors, buyers, and sellers. When collecting antique ceramics, you are collecting some of the most delicate, most beautiful and most varied items that manufacturers can produce.

There are vastly more antique objects made of pottery, porcelain, earthenware or stoneware than of any other material and you probably have some beautiful antique ceramics in your home. You are more likely to possess antique pottery and porcelain than you are antique silver, glass or furniture. The care, beauty and craftsmanship manufacturers and artists build into the form, and the decoration of pottery and porcelain is only rarely surpassed by items in other fields of antique collecting.

Sales of Royal Doulton and Royal Worcester collectibles continue to rise and prove to be a wise investment over the longer term. William Moorcroft pomegranate vase Most of your antique ceramics will be Victorian or early 20th century But a large percentage of us have no idea what we have inherited from parents or grandparents, or what we have in our attics, cellars, garages or the back of rarely opened, cupboards and box rooms. The antique marks site will, hopefully, help you uncover the beauty of your own possessions and will also help you buy or sell profitably in the future.

Read on and understand the basics of antique ceramic, pottery and porcelain forms, glazes, and decoration. There are three main types of ceramic material. Coarse-grained earthenware and harder stoneware that go to make pottery, and the more delicate and fine-grained material collectively referred to as porcelain. The gaps allow water or moisture to soak through the structure and this means earthenware must be glazed if it is to be used to hold water.

Royal Copenhagen Aluminia Faience Marks and Dating codes

The list consists of designers and maker’s marks that have been difficult to find in reference materials so far. When information is found it will appear with credit given to the person who provided it. Thank you, in advance, for your assistance.

The first mark, FULPER in a rectangle, dating is commonly known by collectors and dealers as the “ink mark.” Fake ink marks have been drawn on some non-Fulper pieces with a black marker so it’s wise to confirm authenticity before buying a costly item.

This morning a new Rookwood pottery collector emailed asking for an explanation of the various marks on the bottom of his vase. The following summarizes the basic marks seen on Rookwood Pottery. The most recognized logo in Rookwood history is the backwards R and P. T his logo was used on virtually every piece of Rookwood produced from until the end of production in Between and one additional flame was impressed around the logo for each year; such that in fourteen flames surrounded the Rookwood trademark.

For example the photo to the right shows the Rookwood trademark with 8 flames indicating this vase was produced in Beginning in , the company stopped adding flames to the logo and started using roman numerals below the fourteen flame trademark to date the pottery. The use of Roman numerals to date Rookwood continued until the end of production in In addition to the Rookwood flame trademark, the company marked its pottery with a corresponding shape number.

Rookwood can be found with shape numbers running from 1 to impressed on the bottom of the pottery. Each shape design could be produced in multiple sizes. Rookwood size letters were impressed and typically found right after the shape number.

Masons Ironstone Marks

Minton Date Codes One topic that comes up repeatedly on people’s want-to-know list concerning majolica are the marks used by various potters to mark their wares. Those companies that marked their wares, and many of them did, were erratic in sometimes marking pieces and sometimes not marking pieces. This shouldn’t come as a surprise when you consider that the production period for many of these wares often covered between 50 to years.

Both marks used with impressed year cyphers – see table below. This example December c onwards Example Minton impressed marks showing full set of three marks – month letter O for October, illegible potters mark and year cypher for Found on piece signed c to Standard print mark of a globe with Minton in central band.

The company, based in New Castle, Pennsylvania, continued operations until when it finally closed its doors. From to , the company focused on commercial china for use in restaurants, hotels and large institutions. It wasn’t until , when Theodore Haviland, of Haviland and Co. To identify Shenango-made china, examine the company’s marks for specific production years or look for the client’s name and a date stamp.

Commercial Dishware Collectors of commercial or restaurant dishware use the backstamp on the bottom of plates, teacups and saucers to determine the age of a piece. Because the marks made by the pottery company often changed by production years, these marks can help to identify the age of the china. In addition to the maker’s mark, the Shenango China Company often added the name of the hotel, company or restaurant for whom they made the china.

Porcelain and Pottery Maker’s Marks II (1700’s – 1980’s …

What do all the marks mean? There’s lots of information on the back of plates, if you can work out what it means. Some of these are very obvious, others more obscure. Steve Birks has organised a wonderful site detailing a vast amount of history of Staffordshire pottery.

General Rules for dating marks: There are several general rules for dating ceramic marks, attention to which will avoid several common errors: (1) Royal Arms: Printed marks incorporating the Royal Arms are generally of 19th or 20th century date.

To start, the markings are read in the opposite direction to English. Start at the top right hand corner and read down. If there are 2 lines of Kanji characters, move to the left and start at the top of the next line, reading downwards again. Many of the Japanese makers marks on Satsuma porcelain or pottery are simply the name of the person who made the item, or a generic marking such as “Dai Nippon Satsuma”.

You may also find that there are no main markings, only Japanese numbers. These types of markings are more common on larger vases that form part of a set. The piece may be marked as “Left 3”, meaning that it should be positioned as the third item on the left hand side. Obviously, a vase like this would be part of quite a large set. The centre item may have the main marking of the maker on if it is of sufficient providence.

How to easily identify and date sterling silver hallmarks